Slacker is Hiring an Android Developer! Want to Join our Team?

slackerlogoSlacker is the most complete music service on Earth. And with tens of millions of listeners, we’re growing fast. We are growing so fast that we are constantly looking for talented people to join our team. Right now, we are on the hunt for an experienced android developer.

Are you an Android development guru who is passionate about music? Get ready to meet your dream job!

Slacker delivers free and subscription-based access to millions of songs and hundreds of expert-programmed stations, plus news, sports and talk, on the web, mobile devices, in-car infotainment systems and consumer electronics platforms. By blending a team of expert music curators and content programmers with cutting-edge analytics, Slacker delivers a seamless music discovery experience and uniquely personalized entertainment. Try Slacker at:

We are looking to hire an experienced Android developer in our mobile applications group in sunny San Diego. Join our growing team of engineers as we continue to maintain and improve our world class service and applications.

You’ll be:
· Working in an Agile environment
· Collaborating with product managers, designers, business development teams, and web service engineers — get ready for company-wide visibility
· Working on killer new apps and features
· Maintaining our Android application
· Slacking – wait, is that a word? OK, maybe “working hard and playing hard”

You’ve got to have:
· 5+ years of Java development experience
· 2+ years of professional Android development experience – show us what you’ve done!
· Experience integrating third party SDK¹s
· Heavy UI development experience (animation, swiping, scrolling, etc.)
· Experience developing applications that talk to web services
· Strong communication and organization skills
· A passion for music. You’ll be listening to a lot of it!

We won’t object if you also have:
· Experience with media players, playback, and audio
· Intimate knowledge of networking and the mobile connectivity stack
· Mobile application development experience on other platforms and ecosystems (iOS, J2ME)
· Knowledge of embedding advertising and ad networks

Click here to email us your resume.

We look forward to hearing from you!




Check out the new Slacker EQ!

We’ve got a whole new way for you to experience the “Top 40” here at Slacker as we bring the top 40 charts into the digital age with the Slacker EQ score.

PrintThese are no ordinary music charts. In a world where access to music is quickly trumping ownership, the Slacker EQ is the most accurate reflection of a song’s trending popularity and listener engagement in today’s world of streaming music.

So what exactly is the “EQ”?

“EQ” stands for “Engagement Quotient,” and a Slacker EQ score measures hundreds of millions of weekly data points to indicate how our users are engaging with any particular song. This includes hearts, plays, bans and more.

Check out the infographic to learn more about how we measure a songs EQ score.

Click here to check out this weeks Slacker EQ music charts, which will be released every Thursday and include the 40 most engaging tracks across multiple genres from the previous week.

You can also listen to this weeks Top 40 on the new Slacker EQ station here.











Tips and Tricks for the New Slacker

There’s a lot you can do on the new Slacker. So much in fact, we wanted to share a handful of our favorite features.

What’s your favorite feature? Leave it in the comments!

Here are some of our favorites:

1. Share what you’re listening to. 

Click your name or email address at the top of the page to access your settings. Then click “sharing settings” to link your Twitter and/or Facebook accounts.

New Slacker Player Settings

Or if you’d rather pick and choose what you share, click the share icon!

New Slacker Share


2. Fine tune your station just the way you like.

Click on the fine tune button:

Fine Tune Button

  • Looking to discover new artists? Move the “Related Artists” dial right. Keep it to the far left to only include the artists you love.
  • Your Hearted songs will play more often the further you move the dial to the right.
  • Move the “Popular Songs” dial right to hear what songs are popular on Slacker.
  • Choose if you want to hear new or old songs. Don’t have a preference? Keep it in the middle.
  • Toggle our DJs on or get hourly updates from ABC News and ESPN.

Fine Tuning


3. Don’t know the lyric? We’ve got you covered. 

Click on the song name:

Click on Song Name Lyrics New Slacker

Voila! No excuses to screw up the lyrics anymore. (Full lyrics are only available for Slacker Radio Plus and Slacker Premium subscribers.) For more information and to see how you can get Radio Plus and Premium click here. 

Song Lyrics New Slacker


4. Get recommendations from our music experts.

Click the “Music Guide” for fun and easy music discovery.

Music Guide New Slacker


5. Find out what tracks are hot right now.

Also in the “Music Guide” section, you’ll find what’s hot on Slacker. Updated in real time!

New Slacker Hot Tracks Real Time

6. Looking for friend’s suggestions? We have that too! 

Scroll to the bottom of the “Music Guide” to see what your friends are listening to. Note: you must be connected via Facebook.

 New Slacker Friend Suggestions


We want to hear from you! Tell us your favorite features in the comments.


The 50 Most Embarrassing Songs on Facebook Shows Online Personas are Virtually Naked

Until now, music fans could hide their deepest, darkest secrets. The power to manipulate your public persona with music preferences was actually something that could be done in years past.  Sure you were Indie Guy, Punk Rocker, Goth(lite) Cure Groupie, or raving Candy Kid to everyone who knew you. But, in private – in the quiet comforts of your home where no one was watching – and you sat watching tv or listening to music by yourself, you could shed the grunge flannels, the black eyeliner or the rave gear and listen to *that* song. You know the one. The latest bubble gum hook, the show tune that makes you cry, the anthemic love song that would melt icebergs, the musical equivalent of the latest celebrity gossip magazine – Remember those days? Musical Skeletons could remain hidden – locked inside that special place.

The 50 Most Embarrassing Facebook SongsThose days are over.

Online music listening has changed all that, as playlists often populate personal Facebook timelines and expose carefully guarded musical secrets and fetishes. Life in the digital age has turned 15 minutes of fame into a lifetime of nakedness. Slacker not only understands this conundrum, we’ve decided to embrace it by calling on seasoned experts to take listeners on a journey through multiple decades and genres as they depict the top 50 songs deemed to be the most detrimental to the online personas of music fans.

Experts and pop culture mavens Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum, authors of the best seller I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of Music Video Revolution, serve as our tour guides through Slacker’s “50 Most Embarrassing Songs on Facebook” station. And this isn’t just a station that ho hums through an ordinary list of your typical guilty pleasures and bubble gum favorites of yesteryear. Craig and Rob have used their expertise of music and pop culture to serve as masterful tour guides through a thought provoking countdown that embraces the fact that, while Facebook and social media provide an outstanding platform for music discovery and sharing, it is also the digital community that exposes us all.

We got a chance to talk with Craig and Rob about what this evolution of public personas means for music fans, how Facebook and social media have changed music, why they picked various songs and, after a lot of prying – what musical skeletons they keep tucked away in the closet.


Slacker: You guys are hosting the “Top 50 most Embarrassing Facebook Songs” station on Slacker Radio. This I am sure must come from some personal experience in the loss of your music street cred. So we must know – what are your most embarrassing music skeletons in your closet?

Rob: I am proud of the bad music I listen to as the good music I listen to. In fact, the bad music I listen to is pretty good and the good music I listen to is pretty bad. I am not hiding anything. I am completely naked.

Craig: One of the reasons I enjoyed curating this list is  – I really don’t like the public display of EVERY song people listen to. There is music that I don’t like but nothing I would be embarrassed about. And, unless someone is displaying that they are listening to Neo Nazi music, I tend to think there is nothing to be embarrassed about…. No, I take that back. #1 on our list. If I saw someone was listening to our #1 Chris Brown – I would question things.

Slacker: I tend to think I would be most embarrassed by the fact that I secretly dance around my living room listening to showtunes may damage my street cred to my Facebook friends.

Rob: I just got an idea for a new ap. It would show that you are listening to Velvet Underground when you are actually listening to Hall and Oates.

Craig: Anyone of your friends who would look down on you for listening to showtunes is not worth being a friend.

Slacker:  Your book delves into the golden age of music videos and how MTV shaped an entire generation. One of the things your list brings to light is the major differences between the MTV Generation and the Facebook Generation.  What do you think are the major differences between the two in pop culture and music? 

Craig: Rather than a major difference, I see the integration between online radio and Facebook is an attempt to recreate what happened in the early days of MTV. Back then, every time we interviewed someone they would say the same thing about its emergence. And that was “my friends would come over to my house every day and we would spend three hours together watching MTV.” So MTV was really a group viewing experience. It bonded you with your friends. You would collectively scream when your favorite video came on. You may have argued about other songs you did or didn’t like. But, it was something you all had in common. When MTV stopped playing music videos – people’s music experiences became more isolated.  What Facebook has done is take over where that left off. Groups are larger now but the experience is still there.

Rob: The Internet and the way people listen to music now is, in my opinion, the opposite of what it was like with MTV. When MTV played music videos everyone just sat back and watched. Everyone was watching the same videos at the same time and that is why some of those artists from back then, such as Madonna and Bon Jovi, have the level of success they have now. Everyone was watching or listening to the same thing at the same time. Now, with Slacker and online radio, people can listen to whatever they want, whenever they want and on demand. No one ever has to listen to music that they don’t already like. It is a more active listening experience compared to the more passive one in the past.

Slacker: Ok  since online radio really gives people the flexibility to only listen to what they want. And since the transparency of what we listen to is so public  and what we listen to has such an effect on our online persona where one song can derail your hipster status- what sorts of songs do you present in “50 Most Embarrassing Facebook songs” do you think have the biggest effect? 

Craig: Lets say you meet someone on and think they are really cool. You dig a little deeper and go to their Facebook profile and see they just listened to “Crash Test Dummies’ Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm” – that would be a deal breaker.

Rob: If all they listen to is emotional songs from the 90s, all I am going to picture is candles burning while they sit in a bubble bath and cry. I would imagine you read Nicholas Sparks and perhaps have too much of an investment in rom-coms.

Slacker: Any songs on the list you think would be surprises in the amount of embarrassment they provoke? 

Rob: One of the things we really looked for was bad songs by great bands. For example, Craig and I really love REM. But, even the biggest REM fan in the world – especially the biggest REM fan in the world – knows that Shiney Happy People is a terrible song. The Michael Bolton’s and Celine Dions are too easy. We brought in some incredibly respected and revered acts, and make fun of them too.

Slacker: Clearly no one is safe from embarrassment. I have to ask again – music skeletons? You can’t be completely naked. 

Craig: You first.

Slacker: I actually know the Shiny Happy People dance. Poison’s Unskinny Bop dance too. 

Rob: I would be embarrassed about my adolescent fervor for Jackson Browne. His extreme sensitivity is a little embarrassing in retrospect. I was 14 though, so I had an excuse. But if you are a grown ass man listening to those weepy lyrics – you should be embarrassed.

Craig: I know the words to a lot of songs by Yes.


I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video RevolutionCraig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum understand the pitfalls in creating the carefully cultivated online images of the Facebook Generation. But, clearly they also understand, and are able to poke fun at, the evolution that has taken place from the humble beginnings of digital music during the MTV Generation to the scale it is today. This made the duo the perfect hosts for the station that celebrates our often embarrassing transparency and lack of separation between public and private personas.

Head over to the new station “50 Most Embarrassing Songs on Facebook” to hear what songs made the cut, what songs surprisingly didn’t, and what songs can tarnish your online reputation for good. Our digital footprints are naked. We may as well learn to live with it.

Make sure to also check out Craig and Rob’s smart and decadently entertaining journey through the golden age of music television: I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution. 

Welcome to the Brand New Slacker

The new Slacker is officially live!

Today is a big day. We have been sitting on our hands in anticipation and bursting with excitement as we prepared to unveil a completely redesigned, restructured  and revamped Slacker. And now – the day has arrived.


Slacker Logo

The new Slacker is here.

The start of a new era.

The blossoming of a beautiful new friendship.



So welcome to Slacker – where you will enjoy the best music experience you can get on what is now the most complete music service on Earth. What exactly does that mean? Take a look:



Since 2006, our collective passion for music, commitment to improve, and determination to offer our users the best music experience possible, has brought us to this point. We are now able to offer our 4+ million users more than 13 million songs, the industry’s deepest customization tools, and our unique team of expert music curators and hosts who constantly update Slacker’s more than 200 genre and specialty stations. Gone are the days of hearing the same song over and over again. With Slacker, your music is always fresh, new and exciting.

With today’s launch, Slacker now has the world’s most complete music service for the Web, mobile, auto and home devices, that weave together a seamless music discovery experience everywhere you go. No matter how you listen, when you listen and what you listen to, you will always get uniquely personalized entertainment and countless easy-to-use features.

Watch this video to take a tour of the new Slacker design and see the features you will enjoy:



Now dive right in. Go to Slacker and create your own station or explore hundreds of our specialty stations. Also, make sure to check out the mobile apps and home devices. Remember, Slacker is free on any device.  But, you can also subscribe to Slacker Radio Plus or Slacker Premium service that delivers the ultimate experience. Click here for more information about subscriptions.

We love feedback so feel free to let us know what you think. And, stay tuned. It is going to be a big year at Slacker and a lot of  exciting things are coming your way!


Listen Up. We’re Bringing Music Curation Back.

When I was a kid, pre-Internet, I had a love/hate relationship with the radio.
wnew radioI grew up in New York and in my teens WNEW-FM was my constant companion. WNEW positioned itself as the station “Where Rock Lives.”  Every song seemed perfectly picked, placed, and contextualized — it was music curation at its finest. Listening as a preteen, I discovered tons of new music, or at least artists who were new to me. Rock really did seem to live on that station. Its DJs were true hosts, turning song selection and the music experience into an art form I clung to every word that Jonathan Schwartz, Vin Scelsa, and Scott Muni uttered. After all, in a time before message boards or social media, these people were my friends –intimate friends who turned me on to Bruce Springsteen, the Grateful Dead, and Bob Dylan.

After a while, I became frustrated with WNEW-FM. I had discovered a whole new world, “Where Rock Lives,” and WNEW wasn’t playing very much of it anymore. I heard an occasional Ramones song, but where were the Sex Pistols, the Clash, the Jam, and Wire? WNEW was too busy playing Foreigner, Styx, and Journey.  Yuck, yuck, and yuck. (Ironically, I now have a custom-made Slacker station called The Bands I Hated in High School Kinda Sound Good to Me Now–but I’m getting ahead of myself here.)

Eventually I broke up with WNEW. The station had betrayed me.  There was only so much Foreigner I could take. It certainly was no longer the place where my rock lived. I abandoned the station and, as a result, I abandoned the radio.

Years later – Napster came onto the scene, which changed the music listening experience forever. All the world’s music was accessible with a click of a mouse. I loved Napster at first but soon grew uncomfortable with both its bad song results and lack of artist support.

Through the 2000s I drifted from service to service online. Rhapsody, Imeem, iTunes, eMusic…I tried them all. But somehow, despite the cool music platform that the Web had become, something was missing. Some days I found treasures, but most days it felt a bit cold, clinical Listening to music on these services was mostly clean and efficient, but it wasn’t all that entertaining, and it certainly wasn’t magical. These were algorithms and applications, not good friends and radio hosts, crafting my music experiences. The human element was missing.

For the first time in years, I found myself missing the old WNEW-FM.

Then, in 2011, I found Slacker.

Slacker LogoSlacker would have seemed like an impossible dream to the eighteen-year-old me. It worked everywhere. On my computer, on my phone, in my car. Best of all is the curation. At Slacker, I have more than 200 pre-programmed stations to choose from. Sure, there are the expected genre stations — Today’s Hits, New Hip Hop, Country, and an excellent slate of Alternative stations. But Slacker also digs really deep with Eclectic Rock, Great Songs You ForgotOld School R&B, and Grunge: 20 Years Later. These are thematic stations that terrestrial radio could never dream of.

With Slacker, I can access the biggest hits, or reinvent the concept of formats, on a daily basis. Only people who live and breathe music every day could come up with stations like Dive Bar Jukebox, Broken Heart Radio, or The 50 Most Embarrassing Facebook Songs. No algorithm in the world can put a music mix together like these stations.

With Slacker, I am able to follow hosts like Mat Bates and Scott Riggs, whose expert curation routinely blows me away.

I love Scott’s Indie Hits mix and I find Mat’s New Music First stations invaluable.  I really couldn’t live without The New 40, the Slacker station that plays the best 40 songs regardless of genre, each and every week.

Yet as good at turning me on to music as Mat and Scott are, I love being able to overrule them, to have more power than the DJ, to take a good station and make it better. I can fine-tune any station by tweaking the music mix based on related artists, song popularity, and song age. Fine-tune is an extremely cool feature. I can add sports from ESPN, news from ABC, and talk from American Public Media.

At Slacker, I have total control of a music library of more than 13 million songs. I can lean in and make custom playlists. I can lean back by simply typing a band or song name into the Search box and just let the music play.  For a guy who spent days as a kid making mixed tapes, this seems unbelievably fast, efficient, and wondrous.

Most important, at Slacker I feel like the human spirit of the old WNEW FM, and every great radio station from years past, lives and thrives, but within a new and innovative technological construct. Experts like Scott & Mat make superb stations – they are bringing music curation back. The technology platform makes everything easier, better and more customizable.

So go ahead, poke around, play a station, or enter a song. It’s up to you; the jigsaw jazz and get-fresh flow are here right now. Slacker is where it’s at–all you have to do is Listen Up.

Enter the New Slacker Sweepstakes!

Slacker_Blog_Sweeps (1)

Do you like free stuff? Yeah you do! To celebrate the launch of the new Slacker, we’re giving away a FREE month trial of Slacker Premium to everyone who enters our sweepstakes on Facebook. Seriously, simple as that.

It doesn’t stop there though, we have more than a dozen prizes up for grabs. Take a look below at some of the prizes you can win, including a Grand prize $500 Visa gift card + one year subscription of Slacker Premium.


[SlideDeck2 id=224]


Head over to our Facebook page here to enter the Meet the New Slacker sweepstakes. Good luck!